Global Natural-ness in: Honduras

It has been a while since we’ve last updated the site, so I was very surprised and pleased to receive a new submission to our Global Natural-ness showcase.  Please give a warm welcome to Claysie from Honduras, Central America!

Bantu Knot Out My Version

Name:
Claysie

What country do you live in?
Honduras, Central America

Big Chopped - 1.5 inches of Hair Left

How long have you been natural?
On August 28th 2012 – Will Have 6 months.

First Time 2 Strand Twists on 2 inch Hair

In America, being natural is seen by mainstream culture as rebellious
or unaccepted. Is it the same in your country, or are people more
accepting of natural hair/beauty?
Here in Central America, relaxed hair more accepted for black girls to
have, natural hair is viewed as nappy and unkempt and labeled as
“Bad Hair”. It is hilarious because were I live, it’s a tropical
island, so getting your hair done every month is not cheap and it’s
very hard to find hair products that will work with relaxed hair!!!

One of the main reasons Moms relaxed their little girls hair is
because as the child grows, the hair texture changes from smooth curly
hair to very tight kinky coils and they do not know how to handle it,
so poor Mom tries to comb the hair and of course the poor child is in
pain, so both are traumatized and Creamy Crack becomes their Best
Friend.

More girls are going natural, but they keep their hair short because
they feel to grow their hair longer means a lot of work, so a lot of
the gals keep their hair in the TWA Stage most of the time. Some do
grow their hair quite long but keep it ALWAYS pinned up in a bun, so
you really cannot admire the beauty of their hair.

Now as for reactions from others, it varies, there are alot of Ohh’s
and Ahh’s, smiles and of course the touching to see if it’s real which
is so funny many times. The Latins and Foreigners love natural hair,
it is from them, that we as naturals get the most compliments, you
just gotta love it!!!

Messy Hair Day so to the Scarves - 4 inches of Hair

Additional comments regarding your natural hair:
Love my hair so here is my Hair Story: One of my dearest friends went
Natural and fell in love and tried to get me to do it, of course I
said no way, but after a while, I was convinced by her and my aunty to
do for it so I did and my sister joined in.

I transitioned for 4 months starting from November 11th 2011, Big
Chopped on February 28th 2012 with 1 ½ inch of Natural Hair, loved
the feeling and the look!!!! Currently have 4 inches of natural hair
at 6 months.

Mom did Braids - Hair at 4 inches - Yay!!

Hair type is 4B, very kinky and poofy, hardly any curl definition, I
have been using an Okra Treatment because she was very thin, but now
it’s nice and thick so I am happy except when I have to style it in 2
strand twists, takes about 3 to 4 hours but worth it, because I leave
it in for 2 weeks.

I did not know how to take care of my relaxed hair and hardly ever
retained any length, so I have no regrets at all.

Cut off all heat and only use shampoo once a month, wash my hair
weekly with Conditioner, VO5 is my favorite right now, try to get the
ones that say “Moisturizing”, use a variety of Oils on my hair,
Olive, Carrot, Soybean, Almond, Coconut (My favorite, light but great
for shine and softness).

I agree with keeping it simple, try new things but don’t spend too
much money because it’s not necessary, as long as you try to keep
your hair healthy with a nice sheen, then no worries, thanks for
reading and take care.

Twist Out at 4.1 inches!!!!

Thank you Claysie for sharing your journey with us!

Want to be featured on the site?

I am still looking for submissions to Rep Your State  (for those living in the United States) , Global Naturals (for those living outside of the United States), New Naturals (natural for one year or less)  as well as Natural-ness: Style Share.  Click here to submit your info for one or more of these features: Be a part of Natural-ness

Don’t have a lot of time?  Just want to submit one picture?  Feel free to submit to our Quick Pic feature.  Don’t forget to leave a caption for your picture!  If you would rather not use the form, please email your responses directly to diego2memphis@cbpublish.com

Global Natural-ness in: Namibia

Our second Global Natural-ness feature for the month!  Please meet Shaz with a set of lovely two-strand twists:

Name:
Shaz

What country do you live in?
Namibia

How long have you been natural?
5 months

In America, being natural is seen by mainstream culture as rebellious
or unaccepted. Is it the same in your country, or are people more
accepting of natural hair/beauty?
People tend to follow the Western ideal of beauty more religiously
here,but more people are changing their minds about natural hair.

Additional comments regarding your natural hair:
I never thought I would be able to rock my hair natural,and this is
despite having had natural hair during my late teens.I find my natural
hair to have awakened my creativity towards my hair styling and I
love it!

Want to be featured on the site?

I am still looking for submissions to Rep Your State  (for those living in the United States) , Global Naturals (for those living outside of the United States), New Naturals (natural for one year or less)  as well as Natural-ness: Style Share.  Click here to submit your info for one or more of these features: Be a part of Natural-ness

Don’t have a lot of time?  Just want to submit one picture?  Feel free to submit to our Quick Pic feature.  Don’t forget to leave a caption for your picture!  If you would rather not use the form, please email your responses directly to diego2memphis@cbpublish.com

Global Natural-ness in: South Africa

I love all of the feature submissions that I receive, but along with my New Natural submissions, Global Natural-ness submissions hold a special place in my heart.  I’m humbled when I receive them, because it shows just how small the world really is in that we can learn from and be inspired from ladies all over the globe.  Please give a warm welcome to Fadzayi:

Name:
Fadzayi

What country do you live in?
South Africa

How long have you been natural?
18 Months

In America, being natural is seen by mainstream culture as rebellious
or unaccepted. Is it the same in your country, or are people more
accepting of natural hair/beauty?
Being natural is definitely a new trend that a lot of women are
starting to follow. It used to be seen as being old fashioned or not
keeping on trend but now old is the new new!

Additional comments regarding your natural hair:
My decision to go natural was not a long drawn out one, I was walking
past a barber shop and I just went in and asked them to shave my head
totally out of the blue. My hair had been damaged by a weave I kept in
for too long and I was trying to nurse it back to health. when that
barbers chair was turned around and I saw myself the real me for the
first time in a long time, I never looked back!

Web, blog, youtube or fotki link:
fadzayi@wordpress.com

Want to be featured on the site?

I am still looking for submissions to Rep Your State  (for those living in the United States) , Global Naturals (for those living outside of the United States), New Naturals (natural for one year or less)  as well as Natural-ness: Style Share.  Click here to submit your info for one or more of these features: Be a part of Natural-ness

Don’t have a lot of time?  Just want to submit one picture?  Feel free to submit to our Quick Pic feature.  Don’t forget to leave a caption for your picture!  If you would rather not use the form, please email your responses directly to diego2memphis@cbpublish.com

Road Trip 2011, Rep Your State and other Ramblings

For those who have not “liked” our facebook page or who don’t follow on twitter, you probably don’t know that we are currently on vacation in Oceanside California after a three day road trip from Tennessee.  I love road trips, because you get to see parts of the country that you would not get a chance to see when flying.  We went through the states of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and finally Cali.  By the way, I am so in love with Albuquerque New Mexico!  It is a gorgeous city from the highways, to the homes, down to the architecture and colors chosen to paint the buildings…beautiful!

Anyway, this trip has inspired me to re-announce another way to be featured on the website.  Last year, I introduced the “Natural-ness in the States” feature and received about 20 submissions from states all over the country (check out our “Rep Your State” beauties here: RYS).  States  featured so far include Florida, California, Tennessee, Mississippi, North Carolina, Delaware, South Carolina, Georgia, Texas, New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma and Virginia. My goal was to attempt to post people from the majority, if not all of the states in the US.  I think I want to try it again…so…if you are interested in “Repping Your State”, please check out the following link: Natural-ness in the States.

Don’t live in the United States?  That’s OK, I haven’t left you out.  I’d love to feature you as well!  Here’s the link for naturals outside of the United States: Global Natural-ness.  Here’s the link to check out some of our past Global features: GN

Anyway, back to our trip.  Oceanside is about 40 minutes north of San Diego.  The city of San Diego is so significant for me because it is where I lived for ten years before relocating to Tennessee.   I’m a Cali girl born and raised, originally from the San Francisco Bay area, I moved to San Diego after graduating from high school to attend San Diego State University.  I received my BA in Psychology and my Master of Social Work degrees from SDSU.  San Diego is also where I met some of my best lifelong friends, met and married my husband of almost 10 years and gave birth to my first child.  In other words, this is where I achieved some of my most significant milestones.

Why the heck did we move from this city of paradise to the south?  Well, in a nutshell, affordability.  In the south, we could afford a home.  In San Diego, our rent was more than our current mortgage.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m happy with our decision to relocate.  The south has its own beauty and is so rich in history.  However, it is nice to be back in the city where I experienced so many beginnings.

Well, I’d better sign off before I begin rambling.  I hope you are all having a terrific day and I also hope you’ll consider submitting to either the “Natural-ness in the States” or “Global Natural-ness” features.

Global Natural-ness in: The Caribbean (St. Maarten)

I am so pleased to present another inspiring Global Natural.  This time from St. Maarten.  She sent me so many beautiful pictures, that I had to come up with a creative way to showcase them all (I couldn’t choose between them…her hairstyles are fierce). I hope she does not mind me sharing this, but it’s just too inspiring not to share…she told me in an email message that she did not really learn how to take good care of her hair until earlier this year. This proves that it is never too late to learn to take great care of your hair!  Now I really need to learn to flat-twist (note to self)!

Please meet Bezalel:

Name:
Bezalel

What country do you live in?
Well I hail from the island of St. Maarten in the Caribbean we are under Dutch Government

Bantu Knot-outs

How long have you been natural?
Since December 31st 2008

Flat-twist Buns

In America, being natural is seen by mainstream culture as rebellious
or unaccepted. Is it the same in your country, or are people more
accepting of natural hair/beauty?

The natural scene here on the island is up and coming but as you said its still a fight to be accepted in your natural state. The negative comments and sometimes looks are the same here as well but overall there are still a wide number of naturals here on the island. As we are in the Caribbean there is a lot of braiding but also weaves as well as relaxed hair we have a variety.

Many ladies I have noticed opted for the bc but then don’t go further with it they just keep their hair short. I guess it’s because they don’t know how to style it otherwise, if they do grow it out they simply have a “ruff” puff or twists or braids……..I honestly have not seen bantu knots or twists outs around at all.

Flat twist-outs

Additional comments regarding your natural hair:

(Note: this was originally sent to me for a New Naturals Showcase feature, but Bezalel graciously let me feature her as a Global Natural instead.  Here’s her info as originally submitted)

Date of Last Relaxer: October 2008

Length of Transition: 2 months

Date of BC: December 31st 2008

Favorite Style: flat twistout

Current Routine:
Just taking care of my hair, lots of finger combing, dont like to use combs or brushes. Recently started Henna treatments and I live by my shea butter mixture (sb & amla & olive oil). Do not use heat on my hair, very little use of gel and wash once a week. Oh yeah once every 2 weeks protective styling for a week at a time. That’s it in a nutshell 🙂

Web, blog, youtube or fotki link:
http://www.youtube.com/user/Bezaleeltpmi?feature=mhum

Flat-twist Updos

Do you live outside of the United States and would like to represent your country? If so please fill out the form here: Global Natural-ness. I will be glad to accept more than one entry from the same country. Let’s see what country will be represented the most!If you live in the US and would like to be featured, please check out my Natural-ness in the States page.

Global Natural-ness in: Jamaica

I’m so excited to announce another Global Natural!  I am pleased to present Ruth from the beautiful isle of Jamaica! Her gorgeous hair and the fact that she has been natural for most of her life is definitely an inspiration.  Please give her a warm welcome:

Name:
Ruth

What country do you live in?
The sunny isle of JAMAICA!

How long have you been natural?
Most of my life.

In America, being natural is seen by mainstream culture as rebellious
or unaccepted. Is it the same in your country, or are people more
accepting of natural hair/beauty?

I am actually not sure how natural hair – in general – is viewed.
Seriously. Jamaicans have always done pretty much what they wanted
with their hair, clothing, etc. throughout the years… you will find
lots of variety here.

Locs, however, are only just becoming more ‘mainstream’. In the
earlier days, it was primarily associated with Rastafarians (and
everything they stood for, or didn’t stand for) and – even now –
people tend to have very strong opinions about them. You either
ABSOLUTELY LOVE them or you ABSOLUTELY HATE them.

Additional comments regarding your natural hair:
Natural hair has always been a part of my persona. In 1996, I had what
we call ‘Leisure Curl’ done, which – I think – is basically a
texturizer. I had it done in February of 1996 and the last time my
stylist saw me was in May of the same year.

It just was not for me, and straight hair is not something that has
ever appealed to me, so I never tried that. I ‘transitioned’ without
knowing I was transitioning… with plaits (braids) and twists.

Web, blog, youtube or fotki link:

http://wordkeeperinja.blogspot.com

Do you live outside of the United States and would like to represent your country?

If so please fill out the form here: Global Natural-ness. I will be glad to accept more than one entry from the same country. Let’s see what country will be represented the most!

If you live in the US and would like to be featured, please check out my Natural-ness in the States page.

WANTED: Naturals from all over the Globe

Do you live outside of the United States and would like to represent your country?

If so please fill out the form here: Global Natural-ness. I will be glad to accept more than one entry from the same country. Let’s see what country will be represented the most! Once I get at least 10 submissions, I will randomly choose one person to receive a free e-book version of my Val & Nadine comic strip!

While you’re considering submitting your info, please check out Nachural from England!

Note: If you live in the US and would like to be featured, please check out my Natural-ness in the States page.

Global Natural-ness in: England

I am absolutely honored to present my first Global Natural-ness Feature.  Please meet Nachural from England.  This feature is especially meaningful for me, because I first came in contact with Nachural shortly after I first began my website about five years ago.  She was a frequent visitor to the website and we often conversed back and forth via email.  Nachural recently contacted me again.  I was thrilled when she agreed to be the first featured in my new Global Natural-ness Feature.  Please check out her gorgeous hair, read her inspiring story, leave her comments and give her a warm welcome!

Name (or alias):
Nachural
What country do you live in?
England
How long have you been natural?
I have been natural for almost 5 years now. My last relaxer was 24th August 2005 and I ‘big-chopped’ on 29th October 2005. I have been relaxing my hair since I was 5 years old. Being natural was never an option for me. Infact I firmly held that relaxers were one of the best things invented for ‘afro hair’. I simply accepted the burns and breakage as part of the package. Things, however took a different turn when I met up with a napptural cousin. Her hair was gorgeous and I guess I was inspired. I went to a hairdresser and told her that I was contemplating doing the BC as I had two months worth of grown but she disagreed and said I should just relax my hair. I gave in, trying to convince myself that it was the right decision for me although the very next day I did a google search on natural hair and up came nappturality.com. The site was a real inspiration and so I decided then and there that I was going natural (a day after my last relaxer!).
In America, being natural is seen by mainstream culture as rebellious or unaccepted.  Is it the same in your country, or are people more accepting of natural hair/beauty?
I think the general attitude here is simply: ‘to each their own’. I have never had anyone criticise my natural hair in the UK although some distant relatives are still waiting for me to ‘start relaxing again….!’ The natural scene is definately growning especially in London. There are quite a few natural hair salons coming up as well.
Additional comments regarding your natural hair:
Having and maintaining natural hair is indeed a journey but here are a few things I learnt along the way:
1. Be patient: I have been very frustated at times with my hair along the way. This was either because my hair was either too short in the early stages and I was not really feeling the growing TWA or too much shrinkage which limited my styling options when I was in a hurry.  Some time ago, I washed my hair and left it in a shrunken state (without putting in in twists or braids like I normally do after a wash). A few hours later it was really shrunken and honestly the thought of a texturiser ran through my mind. I went online and found an afro-caribbean hair website. I called the number and spoke to the hairdresser. I explained I was having a bad hair day and I was thinking of getting a texturiser. When I explained that I had natural hair he said, ‘you’ve been without relaxers for so long – I do not recommend you going back to chemical treatments’. He then went through some styling options which calmed me down. When I finished the conversation, I grabbed my spritz, moisturised my hair and put it in twists. The next day I smiled when I saw my hair in the mirror – grateful that I am still natural and I really love being natural!
The lesson here is that you are bound to be frustrated with your hair but ultimately the frustration does pass so just try not to do anything drastic!. It is also important to follow your hair care routine.
2. Have and follow a simple hair regimen: When I first BCed I was quite curious to try out different products ( mainly for ‘curl definition’ and to help combat my dry hair), which I have now simplified. I shampoo and condition my hair weekly. I then spritz with an aloe vera juice, jojoba and castor oil mix. This helps close the cuticles and seal the moisture. I then apply the famous Kimmaytube leave-in conditioner and then style as usual. I have my hair in protective styles during the week – normally in an updo. I spritz with my aloe mix every one to two days.
3. It is possible to comb out locs – well my 16 months locs at least! I was loced for about 16 months. I loved the locs and really liked that I could pretty much get up and go and not worry about styling. I maintained them by latching but decided to comb/pick them out back in July this year.. I did have quite a bit of grown and I am enjoying my loose napps once again. At the moment I do not know if I will loc again but then remember it is a hair journey so you never know……!
4. I would like to thank: (1) Deigo2Memphis (thanks for being my hair mentor during those early days. Your support has been pivotal in helping me continue on this journey), (2) Deecoily of Nappturality.com (a big thank you for creating this amazing website which started me on this amazing journey), (3) Glamazini (for a great website and now youtube page and for continuing to be a naptural inspiration, (4) CNappyMe (thanks for CNapp website) and (5) Mina25 (inspiring and supporting me on my loc journey)…. Oh and not forgetting ‘the hairdresser’!
PS: I am a 4b or Cnapp…lol!

Do you live outside of the United States and would like to represent your country?

If so please fill out the form here: Global Natural-ness. I will be glad to accept more than one entry from the same country.  Let’s see what country will be represented the most! Once I get at least 10 submissions, I will randomly choose one person to receive a free e-book version of my Val & Nadine comic strip!

If you live in the US and would like to be featured, please check out my Natural-ness in the States page.

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